Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Bond Dans Tapestry at Gripsholm Slott, Rörospols, art of Hans Holbein, Sebald Beham, Franz Brun




Here is a link to a pdf document describing the tapestry and works of art.

Bond Dans Tapestry at Gripsholm Slott, Rörospols, art of Hans Holbein, Sebald Beham, Franz Brun


Bond Dans Tapestry reverse and modified color image

A friend has found a large color picture of the tapestry in a yearbook with dance images published by a cultural group Föreningen Norden.    The picture is a mirror image of the tapestry.    Possibly at some point the picture negative was flipped.

As of 30 June 2016,  I have found a 2014 web link describing the tapestry plate II and pages 24,25.
Böttiger, John, Svenska Statens Samling af Väfda Tapeter.  Stockholm 1898
John Böttiger dated the tapestry to Sweden circa 1540 to 1550.   He found the figures based on Sebald Behams works circa 1535,   Bartsch VIII 154-163, and especially 168.   He wrote it was possibly in a royal inventory in 1553.   ( page 21.  a tapestry with 2 couples dancing and musicians
playing pipa and a qvinnobellette medt en giga )

This is available for viewing from the U.S.   Swedish copyright expired 70 years after Böttiger's
 death in 1936?
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=gri.ark:/13960/t5k965t90;view=1up;seq=42;size=175


  Bond Dans tapestry


Tuesday, April 19, 2016

References for Bond Dans Tapestry and related Dance imagery and description


The worldcat.org website is very useful for finding access to works.   Some books I purchased
from Izzy Young in Stockholm when he was selling books back in 1982.   Which gave an background on the history of music and dance in Scandinavia.   More recently the
most important reference is Alison Stewart's book,  Before Bruegel,  Sebald Beham and the Origins of Peasant Festival Imagery.   This cost about 100 dollars used.   Used copy of Moxey's text was available for less than 10 dollars.   I came across Knackfuss's book on Holbein in a book store.   I was lucky to purchase a used copy of Egil Bakka's book on line.




 Art History references.

Dodgson, Campbell  Early German and Flemish Woodcuts preserved  British Museum,1903, London
Gibson,   Walter S. Festive Peasants before Bruegel: Three Case Studies and Their Implications
 Simiolus: Netherlands Quarterly for the History of Art
  Vol. 31, No. 4 (2004 - 2005), pp. 292-309     http://www.jstor.org/stable/4150595
Knackfuss, H.   Holbein,   Beilefeld and Leipzig ,  1899
Moxey,  Keith P.F. Peasants, Warriors, and Wifes. Popular Imagery in the Reformation, Chicago Il. And London, 1989
Stewart,  Alison G.    Before Bruegel Sebald Beham and the Origins of Peasant Festival Imagery, 2008
Stewart,  Alison G.  The_Kermis_woodcuts_of_Sebald_Beham_in_Reformation_Nuremberg, 1993.
                                       http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/artfacpub/1/
Stewart,  Alison G.   Numerous papers available on line at  the above website.
 von Roda, Burkard, The Historical Museum Basle,   1994,  Basle. item 283.
Woltmann, Alfred,     Holbein and His Times,  1872,  London

 Scandinavian Dance and Music References

Bakka, Egil,  Norske Dansetradisjonar,  Oslo, 1988
Boberg, Juno, Den svenska folkdans-rörelsen 100 år,  4 parts,  in Om Dans,  4-80,1-81,4-81,2-82  Stockholm
Charters, Samuel,  Spelmännen : i bilder och egna ord, 1979, Stockholm
Hakansson, Greta,   Folkdanser   chapter  Dansen genom tiderna,  1981, Falkoping
                                     Theodor  (Dirk) de Bry
Klein,  Ernst,   Om Folkdans edited Mats Rehnberg,  1978, Stockholm,  original                                    1933,1937,1929.1927
Ling, Jan,  Svensk folkmusik,  1964, 1980,  Stockholm
Ling, Jan, A history of European folk music,  1997 Rochester, N.Y.
Norman, Ingvar,  (Karlhom, Göran,  Larsson, Johan)                                                                          Svenska Folkdanser del II,  1971,  Uppsala
Nyhus,  Sven,  Pols I Rorostrakton,  1973,1981  Oslo
Rehnbeg,  Mats,   Klackarna i taket. Om halling och jössehäradspolska,  1966 Stockholm
Sodal, Ingvar,  Folk dance in Norway, Balkan Arts Tradition,  Vol III,  number 1,  1977
     http://www.ctmd.org/pages/balkanartstraditions1977.pdf


 General Dance and Music Reference

Antiquary,  An    The Dance,   London 1911.
Dils,  Ann Hamilton,  Peasant Dance in the Genre Art of  Sixteenth Century Flanders and Germany,            1981 Thesis Ohio State University
https://etd.ohiolink.edu/rws_etd/document/get/osu1392052544/inline
Nettl, Paul. Birth of the Waltz, in Dance Index vol 5, no. 9. 1946 New York: Dance Index-Ballet    Caravan, Inc. pages 208, 211
Wallace, Carol McD.   Dance A very Social History, 1985  New York

 Travelogues

 Brooke.  Arthur de Capell,  Travels through Sweden, Norway, and Finmark, to the North Cape, 1822 London

Clarke, Edward Daniel,   Travels in Various Countries of  Scandinavia, Vol 2  1819,   London  1838,
 https://archive.org/details/travelsinvarious02clar

Gordon,  Jan and Sara J,  Two Vagabonds in Sweden and Lapland, 1926 New York  p 92-93,  123-127

Lovett, Richard M.A.,  Norwegian Pictures Drawn with Pen and Pencil, 1885,  London

Lowe,  Helen,   Unprotected Females in Norway,  1857,  1859  London

Price, Edward,   Norway and its Scenery,  1853 London


 Fiction
Bremer,  Frederika,   Strife and Peace,   1839

   Interesting works which I have not read.
Eldsjälarna och dansarvet – Om forskning och arbetet med att levandegöra äldre dansformer
Koudal, Jens Henrik,  For Borgere og  Bønder  Stadsmusikantvæsenet i Danmark 1660-1800
 Ramsten, Märta   The Polish dance in Scandinavia and Poland : ethnomusicological studies 2003, Stockholm

Friday, April 8, 2016

Dance art of Hans Holbein the younger

Before he moved to England and painted portraits of Henry the VIII and Anne of Cleves Holbein worked in Basel Switzerland.    Holbein's dance works include painting the facade of the Haus zum Tanz, a 24 character alphabet of a peasant wake,  ( fest ),   and several woodcuts used for illustrations on book cover pages.




Detail of Table of Cebes circa 1521,  the garden of Luxuria,  ( Lust ).   Two couples dance the foresteg,  ( beginning step),  with man's left arm raised and man leading parner holding her left hand.

   With sex, dance, music and gambling the garden of Luxuria precedes the garden of Love.


Holbein's designs include images of the dance walking step with man's left arm raised as above.
The figure in the Haus zum Tanz with the purse is copied in Sebald Beham's 1535 kermit feast,
 or peasant feast and Franz Bruns 12 metal work miniatures of 24 dancers and musicians.
 The earliest print or painting I have found so far of this "step"  is the 1494  Nuremburg Chronicals,  and then the pencil work by Dürer in about 1516.

Haus zum Tanz   was painted in 1519 or 1520.   A replica was made as in the Basel museum.
The house itself was destroyed in the early 20th century.

In a color image of one side  you can see the dancer with the purse with his left arm raised.
Six more dancers can be seen in this photo.

Holbein metalcut book illustration and repeated printed by Cratander

Another peasant dancing illustration printed by Petri in about 1527.

Holbein also designed the earliest to date that I know of picture of a couple dancing in the closed position in 1525 peasant wake 24 character alphabet.    The letter H

References  ( Note that Jstor permits guests to have 3 documents "checked out" at no charge )
Festive Peasants before Bruegel: Three Case Studies and Their Implications
Walter S. Gibson
Simiolus: Netherlands Quarterly for the History of Art
Vol. 31, No. 4 (2004 - 2005), pp. 292-309
(article consists of 18 pages)
Published by: Stichting voor Nederlandse Kunsthistorische Publicaties
DOI: 10.2307/4150595
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4150595

Holbein and his Time,  1872,   page 218.
Peasant alphabet,  letters  A,B,L,V   (  A,B,V are among the 14 of the British Museum ).
There are links to online versions of this text.


Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Franz Brun's peasant festival copied from Sebald Beham and Hans Holbein the younger


Thanks to the British Museum allowing internet access to photographs of their print collection I have identified several additional sources of Franz Bruns peasant festival prints and a correction to the
"Curator's comments
Some of the couples reverse copies after Beham's Peasants' Feast (Hollstein 177-186), otherwise loosely based on Beham's series."


  The British Museum prints of  Franz Brun's  23 dancing couples include 4 couples closely copied from Sebald Behams 1535 "The Village Fair"    which Alison G. Stewart has called "The Large Kermis"   The Museum's Franz Brun's' peasant festival prints  link is

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1435339&partId=2

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?assetId=82401001&objectId=1435339&partId=1

 The Museum's Sebal Beham 1535 Village Fair link is
   http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1363397&partId=1
 One couple copied from Sebald Behams 1537 peasant feast series.
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1569739&partId=1
 and 3 couples closely copied from Holbeins metalcuts use in several prints.
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1418036&partId=1
 The design by Holbein was initially cut by master C.V.     Cut by Jacob Faber.
 One of these 3 couples copied for Holbein's metal cuts is also present in the peasant feast(or wake) alphabet letter "B".     Link to Holbein's letter B
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_image.aspx?objectId=1597518&partId=1&orig=%2fresearch%2fsearch_the_collection_database.aspx&numPages=10&currentPage=1&asset_id=557720001
An additional couple is copied from a work attributed to Barthel Beham.
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1511735&partId=1

 The  Museum description of a "reverse" image copy of Beham is possibly due to the Hollstein reference from the 1950s being based on a "reverse" copy of  Beham's wedding feast.     "True" image copy will have the dancers sword scabbards on the dancer's left side.   The Museum first instance of Beham's "The Village Fair"  show the true image,  as do the dancers in Franz Brun's 12 etchings.






http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?partid=2&assetid=82463001&objectid=1435339

  Both couples copied from Sebald Beham's 1535  Large Peasant Feast,  ( Kermis)

   http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1363397&partId=1






http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?partid=2&assetid=82461001&objectid=1435339



Left couple copied from Holbein's woodcut.   Link
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1418036&partId=1
Link to Holbein's peasant dance woodcut
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?assetId=58392001&objectId=1418036&partId=1


 Right couple copied from Bartel Beham.



http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1511735&partId=1




     Right couple a combination from round dance couple and a sword dancer couple from Sebald Beham's  1535 The Village Fair.   Appears to have an ankle bracelet with bell.

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?partid=2&assetid=82460001&objectid=1435339

   http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1363397&partId=1



http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?partid=2&assetid=82458001&objectid=1435339

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?partid=2&assetid=82403001&objectid=1435339


   Left couple copied from Holbein in each case   70,72.
     Right couple of B.IX,459,70  modified copied from Sebald Beham 1537 peasant dance series.

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?assetId=58392001&objectId=1418036&partId=1






 

   B.IX,459,70   the right couple is from Beham's 1537 peasant feast series.
http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_details.aspx?objectId=1569739&partId=1


  B.IX,459,72  the left couple is also from Holbein's 1525 peasant feast alphabet,  letter "B",  as
  well as Holbein's metalcut.

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/search_the_collection_database/search_object_image.aspx?objectId=1597518&partId=1&orig=%2fresearch%2fsearch_the_collection_database.aspx$numPages=10&currentPage=1&asset_id=557720001










http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details/collection_image_gallery.aspx?partid=2&assetid=82401001&objectid=1435339

    Left couple copied from Sebald Beham, The Village fair 1535.



 Updated March 29, 2016.    The museum assetid numbers now have a 001 suffix.

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Links or clues to Pols and Polska History 1618 to 1800

      The nicest link is probably the two page Ewa Dahlig-Turek's on history of
      mazurka music.

1. Per Brahes Lute music lesson book  1618-1619.

2,    The Düben collection  1620 to 1726  concertmasters for Swedish Royal Court.

3. Ramsten,  Märta,  her coauthor  Ewa Dahlig-TUREK on mazurka and polska music.

4.  Finnskog Nationalist Gottlund,   folklorist 1821 Dalarna,  and 1817 or later Varmland

5. Index of    Ala-Könni,  E.  Die Polska-Tänze in Finnland,  1956  Phd dissertation in German,   referenced by both Mat Rehnberg in Om folkdans,  and Jan Ling.

6. The Danes are getting tunes from Rasmus Storm  circa 1760.

7. Jan Ling writes about Swede Gustaf Blidström's  1715 - 1716 collection of  300 minuets and polskas.

8. Kjellberg,  ( 1983  page 126)  points out  "A division becomes tangible between art and folk music songs of the polonnaise and polska types."




  1.
     http://www.academia.edu/874472/Per_Brahes_lute_book


     I have downloaded the pdf document.    3 Teutcher Dantz  and 1 Polensk Dantz.
     Jan Olof Ruden explains that this a Western Europe student's music book  circa 1618 and
     that is happpenstance that it was created by a Swedish student.
     He reports many errors in the manuscripts.
   



 2.
The Düben collection at Uppsala University contains 2,300 musical manuscripts donated in 1732.
The 4 generations of the Düben family were concertmasters for the Swedish Royal court from 1640
to 1726.   There is a number of dance music suites.   There is one example of a springer dance,  in a
set containing a Holland dance.
   http://www2.musik.uu.se/duben/DubenCollectionInfo.php



  Click on DCDC Advanced Search
 Check instrumental  and sort by title in the advanced search.
  Click find
   Click on the 576 work  box
   On the work you are interested in,  click on select,   to see the suite contents for example,
        or to further click on a photo of the music.



Andreas Düben the Elder, became a principal figure in Swedish musical life. He traveled to Stockholm from his hometown Leipzig for the Royal wedding of 1620,
first assuming the position of organist and second concertmaster and later as principal concertmaster in 1640.
Members of the Düben family held this position as concertmaster for four generations until 1726. Anders von Düben donated the “Düben collection” –
a unique compilation of 2,300 musical manuscripts from over all of Europe – to the Uppsala University Library in 1732.
  Here is a rough count of the individual dance melodies,  independent of the 40 or 50 suites.
  Allemand  44 entries
  Branle       11 entries
  Gaÿ (Branle) 9 entries
   Montirande (Branle)  8 entries
  Courante   75 entries
   Galliard    10 entries
   Gavotte     10 entries
   Menuett      3 entries
   Pavane or Pavana  25 entries
   Polonaise    1 entry
   Saraband(a)(e)  32 entries
   Springtanz   1 entry,  Klein Comedien Sachen)   or Springer  1675-1679

Dance de Hollande [in Kleine Comedien Sachen] also known as Holländisch Tanz [in Kleine Comedien Sachen]

  Here is an example of several dance suites in the database.
allemande-courante-sarabande-gigue  1610-1669
pavane-allemande-courant-courant-sarabande-sarabande
intrade-passepied-bourré-entrée-gavotte-menuett-rondeau-gigue
1684 opera
capriccio-gigue-gavotte
sonatina-allemande-courante-gavotte-sarabande-gigue-sonatina


 3.

http://www.english.pan.pl/images/stories/pliki/publikacje/academia/2004/01/26-27_dahlig.pdf



EWA DAHLIG-TUREK
Institute of Art, Warsaw
Polish Academy of Sciences


The history of the mazurka and the polonaise

Ewa Dahlig-Turek, who worked with Marta Ramsten on Polska dans in Scandinavia and Poland,
has this introduction to the history of the mazurka and the polonaise music.   She cites examples
going back to the 1500s.


4. Carl Axel Gottlund,  Finnskog supporter from early 1800s.
   Very interesting wikipedia entries on him.
From the LP record notes of Lekar och visor from Josseharad.

1821  beskriver den finske studenten Gottlund polskan i Jösse Härad på
följande sätt.

Och denna är en förbannad takt, det är en allegro con moto,
så både de dansande och de some spela få svetten i pannan.
Gossarna visa därvid en ofantelig vighet  saltomoralsprång ingå i dansen
och flickorna en förvånande lätthet.

C. A. Gottlund. Dagbok öfver dess resor på finnskogarne i Dalarne, Helsingland, Vestmanland och Vermland år 1817. Utgiven av Nils Sahlström med förord av K. B. Wiklund. [With a portrait and a map.].   Published Stockholm,  1931,  and Falun,  1984.
    Google books search of this diary shows 4 instances of polska,  4 of spela, and 2 of dansades.
    He writes of dances of waltzes, polskor,  and anglais.

     I can only speculate on the finnskog emmigration from Finnland circa 1600 to 1632  effect on
      bygdedans in Norway , Western Sweden,  and  even other regions of Sweden.
      Today many Swedish fiddlers are of Finnish descent.
      I recall Jofried Sodal from Trondelog Norway telling me that the songs in Svenska bygdedansar
      del II were in her dialect.    Similarly the one can compare the singing in Finnish with recorded
      songs from Western Dalarna and the NRK video series songs,   especially those in the
      Halbakken videos.

 5.
Index of    Ala-Könni,  Erkki.  Die Polska-Tänze in Finnland,  1956  Phd dissertation in German,   referenced by both Mat Rehnberg in Om folkdans,  and Jan Ling.
http://books.google.com/books/about/Die_Polska_T%C3%A4nze_in_Finnland.html?id=pFUYAQAAIAAJ

  There is a short wikipedia entry on him.

Saturday, March 26, 2016

Polsk and Springarbo from Unprotected Females in Norway, 1857, Helen Lowe


  Unprotected Females in Norway,  1857,  1859  Helen Lowe

   Page 108.    Almost verbatim of Edward Price's   Norway and its Scenery 1853
     Story of the Hulder,     ( with the addition that the fiddler uses a Hardanger fiddle )

   Page 83,  Dancing on Sunday  or  Sunday Amusements  in Jerkin

Sliding along, her hair often waving from beneath her head-dreass,
the girl follows her partner
round the room till she catches his extended hand;  they then join in the lively “polztanz”
together;  separating afterwards,   except by the one hand,
 she turns beneath his raised arm
with a charming movement,  and then goes off with him again
doubly quick in the “springarbo.”
After each dance, the men, walking around with their partners,
laid a small coin before the musician; so there was no difficulty
as to who was to pay the piper. This is the Norwegian
peasants' way of spending Sunday afternoon, when they can manage it.

 Page 211,    Hallingdal,   description of Halling dance,  and belt fights  to be repeated in
 travelogues for many decades.

  The lively airs (Slot) express in the most perfect manner the agility, the boldness,
  and singularity of the dance and never fail to exercise a powerful charm on
  all those who are acquainted with them.
  You feel yourself, as it were, raised from the floor, and wish, like the practiced
Halling dancer, to touch the rafters of the ceiling with your toes.   The dancer jumps
up light as a feather, turns round in the air,  and descends again standing on one leg;
on the floor he curves also,  resting on one heel while his jacket  describes a circle
 around him like a bell.    Then he makes a jump to the opposite side of the room
 and goes on as before.

  Page 239,   Hitterdal,   Telemark,   ( Hitterdalsvatn I assume )
… and get up to a grand dance to celebrate the event,  the national “Eismel,”
 which is the same nature as the “Halling,”  being danced alone,
and when by a fine stalwart peasant in his best,  is an animating sight.

 Comments

  Note the use of the polztanz instead of the Danish polsk or Norwegian pols.
  I have  not found any other references using  "springarbo".  
  Interesting is the nomenclature by Lowe describing the "polztanz"  and "springarbo".
  Lively may refer to the feet in the air of the half quick dance turn.
  Eismel perhaps translate as "ice bound"  or "captured by ice".   Again this is a term
  that I have only found in this work.   Lowe is not writing in a vacuum,  she takes Price's
  story of the Hulder almost verbatim.   Frederika Bremmer's descriptions of the
  "halling polska"  were available from about 1839 to an English translation in 1852 or so.
  Her use of Jerkin locale for the dance description is an echo of the
  1820 visit by Arthur de Capell Brooke.
 

Friday, March 18, 2016

The Düben Collection Swedish Court Music 1640 to 1726

                              The Düben Collection


The Düben collection at Uppsala University contains 2,300 musical manuscripts donated in 1732.
The 4 generations of the Düben family were concertmasters for the Swedish Royal court from 1640
to 1726.   There is a number of dance music suites.   There is one example of a springer dance,  in a set containing a Holland dance.
   http://www2.musik.uu.se/duben/DubenCollectionInfo.php


  Click on DCDC Advanced Search
 Check instrumental  and sort by title in the advanced search.
  Click find
   Click on the 576 work  box
   On the work you are interested in,  click on select,   to see the suite contents for example,
        or to further click on a photo of the music.



Andreas Düben the Elder, became a principal figure in Swedish musical life. He traveled to Stockholm from his hometown Leipzig for the Royal wedding of 1620,
first assuming the position of organist and second concertmaster and later as principal concertmaster in 1640.
Members of the Düben family held this position as concertmaster for four generations until 1726. Anders von Düben donated the “Düben collection” –
a unique compilation of 2,300 musical manuscripts from over all of Europe – to the Uppsala University Library in 1732.
  Here is a rough count of the individual dance melodies,  independent of the 40 or 50 suites.
  Allemand  44 entries
  Branle       11 entries
  Gaÿ (Branle) 9 entries
   Montirande (Branle)  8 entries
  Courante   75 entries
   Galliard    10 entries
   Gavotte     10 entries
   Menuett      3 entries
   Pavane or Pavana  25 entries
   Polonaise    1 entry
   Saraband(a)(e)  32 entries
   Springtanz   1 entry,  Klein Comedien Sachen)   or Springer  1675-1679

Dance de Hollande [in Kleine Comedien Sachen] also known as Holländisch Tanz [in Kleine Comedien Sachen]

  Here is an example of several dance suites in the database.
allemande-courante-sarabande-gigue  1610-1669
pavane-allemande-courant-courant-sarabande-sarabande
intrade-passepied-bourré-entrée-gavotte-menuett-rondeau-gigue
1684 opera
capriccio-gigue-gavotte
sonatina-allemande-courante-gavotte-sarabande-gigue-sonatina